Trains through Laramie

The railroad remains a constant mover of life and goods to keep the connections between east and west United States.  Sure, aircraft can move people and goods faster, but think about the train – the volume of goods moved, support to towns and communities, the direct connection of those on the ground.  The railroad continues to develop and maintain a unique way of life, particularly out west. 

The clanging, rattling of the tracks, engines roaring, rails came alive in May 1868, the historic day when a train whistle marked the arrival of the first train in Laramie, Wyoming, on the newest section of the Union Pacific Railroad. 

Builders kept at the task and inched along, achieving milestones little by little. The west was being explored, although with hardship, and there would be success.

There is a remarkable difference from the trains and railroad operations of years past to the modern trains of today.  There remains still a little bit of the old western feel though.  Thankfully, the Laramie Railroad Depot helps preserve the past. 

In 1924 the Laramie depot was built to replace the town’s original Union Pacific Depot and Hotel that was destroyed by fire in 1917.  The depot served as Laramie’s Union Pacific passenger depot until 1971, and as an Amtrak depot until 1983. In 1985, the Union Pacific Railroad gave the Depot to the Laramie Plains Museum, which then transferred ownership to the Laramie Railroad Depot Association in 2009.

Postcard image of the 1924 Laramie Railroad Depot (https://laramiedepot.org/history)

“The Depot is the only remaining building left from the once large Union Pacific presence in Laramie and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1988. The railroad is the reason for the city’s original existence, and the Depot is an important part of Laramie’s historic legacy.” More history is located at https://www.laramiedepot.org/history.

I enjoyed standing on the railroad walkway watching the trains move along, thinking of the history, and wondering what people from 1868 would say about these trains today. 

Blessings along the Way!

Ron