What’s unique about a sunrise?

First, I want to say THANK YOU for being a friend and partner as I finally reached 100 followers. It seems like a long time getting there.  I think to receive friendship one must be a friend and I appreciate each of you around the world. It shows we can be friends no matter where we call home, and even with different views of life.

I have been trying to post a blog for the past few days about some recent short trips but haven’t taken sufficient quiet time to gather my thoughts and photos.

So, I’ll post some sunrise photos in the interim and pose this question. What is unique about each sunrise – or – are they all the same?

How do clouds affect the sunrise and sunset? Have you noticed how the glow casts beautiful colors to clouds that have formed. True light brings beauty.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Does it matter how high you fly or is the sunrise just a glorious? (Photo: Melissa Sweet)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Is the beauty from our own perception? This photo was taken while flying into Atlanta, Georgia. Just imagine the beautiful sunrises and sets we miss daily by not taking the time to absorb them wherever we are. (Photo: Melissa Sweet)
Sunset at Daytona Beach Shores. Compare the difference between the sunrise and the sunset. 

(Unless otherwise noted photos by Ronlin Photography)

Ocean divide – sunset or rise

As we gaze across the sea at each other’s world, what do you see? Thousands of miles of natural barrier without the vessels to merge our physicality.

There are no barriers even across oceans so wide – that our thoughts can’t merge – for the benefit of humankind.

Way across the Atlantic from west to east I see, and yet wonder if you’re looking back at me.

 

From my very breezy abode at Florida’s Daytona Beach Shores, anticipation builds as the sun casts its glow; and yet I wonder what you see from abroad.

Although there are clouds that darken the sky, hiding the rays; I know the sun is there ready to break through another day.

 

 

 

 

 

I see the rays over the clouds and no darkness hides the light. Even in the darkest of night the sun still shines as bright.


 

 

 

 

While the wind howls and the sand blinds our eyes, the sun arises, not to my surprise.


And still I wonder what you see, across the barrier so far?

Is the glow diminishing and easing out of sight? While others see it rising – to stir surrounding life.

With anticipation we see the glow peek, and say hello to the morning break.


While you may be far, we are still here. Although the waves crash around – there is peace above, as –

The sun shines bright to light our day – and chases the dark so far away.

So remember each day there is sunset and rise. We can still see the world as one and choose to shine.

With Heavenly Love, Ron

Time’s a changing!

 

Clock in Clinton, OK
Town clock in Clinton, Oklamoma

 

Depending on where you are around the globe you either adjusted your clock or you are about to change with the time.  Maybe you’ll change it later this month.  Maybe it’s time to actually “change with the time.”

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How much daylight does the modern farmer need?

It’s what we call Daylight Saving Time when we turn the clock forward on the second Sunday in March in the U.S.A.  The idea was initially created to help farmers and others to have extra daylight.  Well, I could always use that extra hour of sleep I’ll lose tonight.  Many of you have already lost it.

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Rise and shine with daylight as the sun signals the dawn of a new day.  In today’s modern society do we actually depend on the sun to light our way?

I feel for the person who will be late for work because he or she “didn’t get the memo” or forget to set the clock.  Well – maybe the clock can be blamed for it this time.

What about all of you traveling? Are computers automatic enough to keep up with your travels and the constant time changes?

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Railroads and industry make good use of time and may be impacted by time changes.

Does the time change affect you in addition to the jet lag?

There has been some buzz lately about initiatives to keep the clock the same without having to “spring forward” or “fall back.”  Why can’t we just keep it the same?  I know I feel a little more tired each time we change – whether forward or backward – and it takes about a week to adjust.  Maybe it’s only my mindset.

Regardless, can’t we just keep it the same?  Has the time come where the time change doesn’t really matter that much?  I would like to hear your thoughts around the world.  Do you even change the time to accommodate the season?

In the U.S. Arizona and Hawaii don’t change and Florida has just passed legislation to keep the time on Daylight Saving Time.  I’m not sure if that is the right course of action.  If anything, can’t we keep it on the standard time?  I mean, it’s not like we get extra time.  We all have 24 hours in a day, right?

Maybe I’m not that smart to really understand the issues.

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Ponce de Leon Inlet Lighthouse in Florida shines brightly with upgraded lens compared to years past, still leading mariners and land travelers to their safety.

So, is light relative to the task at hand? Lighthouses are still in use (although more scarce) and provide their intended light.  If we need more daylight maybe, just maybe, we can use solar and other artificial light more effectively and efficiently.

Webexibits.org (http://www.webexhibits.org/daylightsaving/b2.html) mentions a poll  conducted by the U.S. Department of Transportation indicating “Americans liked Daylight Saving Time because ‘there is more light in the evenings / can do more in the evenings.’  A 1976 survey of 2.7 million citizens in New South Wales, Australia, found 68% liked daylight saving. Indeed, some say that the primary reason that Daylight Saving Time is a part of many societies is simply because people like to enjoy long summer evenings, and that reasons such as energy conservation are merely rationalizations.”

What say ye?

CNN reported that the idea of daylight saving was first conceived in the U.S. by Benjamin Franklin in 1784.  Wow, I didn’t know the idea goes back that far.  CNN has some other good information on the timeline and issues in their post at https://www.cnn.com/2018/03/09/politics/daylight-saving-time-florida/index.html.

“Daylight Saving Time is one of those weird quirks of the Western world — most countries outside Europe and North America don’t take part,” CNN states. “Everyone, for the most part, is pretty excited to fall back in October and bemoans losing an hour of sleep in March.”

I say let’s just make the best of it until we can “change with the time” again.