Mountaintop

 

  1. Pikes Peak below summit 4
    View from the back of the gift shop just below the summit (peak) at more than 11,000 feet elevation.  Travelers to the summit take the bus due to construction.   

Reach for the mountaintop,

Even though breath is labored and you breathe in deep.

For I’m from a lower plain, not accustomed to the steep.

The head is a little light, and I take it slow,

But I behold the wonderful beauty that’s set above.

Pikes Peak summit area from gift shop-2Where do you go once the peak you reached?

Can you go higher, or down in retreat?

Pikes Peak summit area from gift shop
Image behind the gift shop just below the summit.
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Pikes Peak gift shop and restaurant just below the summit.

Pikes Peak below summit

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Image behind the gift shop looking upward to the summit area.
Pikes Peak summit area from gift shop-3
Image behind the gift shop just below the summit.  I wonder how many would be tempted to climb these rocks?
Pikes Peak summit area from gift shop- no scrambling
Image behind the gift shop just below the summit.  

Pikes Peak summit area from gift shop-4At Pikes Peak the choice is clear,

Downward I travel – beauty still around,

Pikes Peak summit area from gift shop-5Of the trees, the lake, the rocks and life.

pikes peak lake
The summit trip was cut short due to weather – and snow beginning; hence no photos from the summit itself.  

Pikes Peak leaving signI’m glad I had this mountaintop trip,

Instead of looking above from below,

Wondering what it would look like, or be,

Of the experience that one loves.

Pursue your mountaintop experience – physical, mental and spiritual.

Blessings!

Ron

Pikes Peak Info – Thoughtco.com

Elevation: 14,115 feet (4,302 meters)

Prominence: 5,510 feet (1,679 meters)

Location: Front Range, Colorado

Coordinates: 38.83333 N /  -105.03333 W

Map: USGS topographic map 7.5 minute Pikes Peak

First Known Ascent: Dr. Edwin James and 2 others, July 14, 1820.

Ute Indian Name

The Tabeguache Band of the Ute Indians, who often camped in the valleys below the mountain, called it Tava or “Sun.” Tabeguache means “People of the Sun Mountain.” The Arapaho Indians from northern Colorado called the great peak heey-otoyoo’, which means “long mountain.”

Named for Zebulon Pike

Pikes Peak is named for explorer Zebulon Pike, who described the mountain on an expedition in 1806 to determine the southern boundary of the newly acquired Louisiana Purchase. Pike, naming the mountain Grand Peak, attempted to climb it from the south but deep November snows thwarted his summit bid. The early Spanish explorers called it El Capitan or The Captain for its dominance of southern Colorado’s landscape.

First Known Ascent in 1920

The first recorded ascent was by Dr. Edwin James, a botanist on Major Stephen H. Long’s expedition, along with two others on July 14, 1820. James’ party set a forest fire on the way down, scorching thousands of acres. Major Long named the peak for Dr. James, but trappers and mountain men continued to call it Pikes Peak.

First Woman to Climb in 1858

Julia Archibald Holmes was the first recorded woman to climb Pikes Peak with her ascent on August 5, 1858.

She was also the first woman to climb a Fourteener in Colorado. No other woman accomplished that feat for 23 years. Read Julia Archibald Holmes: First Woman to Climb Pikes Peak for the complete story about her landmark ascent.

Most Visited High Mountain in the USA

Pikes Peak is the most visited high mountain in the United States, with over 500,000 people reaching the summit by hiking, climbing, driving, or cog railway.

Most drive up the paved 19-mile-long Pikes Peak Highway, which starts from Cascade in Ute Pass and winds up to the peak’s flat summit. The Pikes Peak Cog Railway finished in 1891, carries passengers 8.9 miles from Manitou Springs to the summit.

Pikes Peak Marathon

The Pikes Peak Marathon, a grueling test of running endurance, ascends 26 miles up and down Barr Trail every August. The day before the round-trip event is a one-way 13-mile race to the summit.

“America the Beautiful” Song

In 1893 schoolteacher Katherine Lee Bates was so inspired by the view atop Pikes Peak that she wrote “America the Beautiful,” the unofficial hymn of the United States.

Pikes Peak or Bust!

”Pikes Peak or Bust” was the slogan of the 1858/1859 gold rush to the diggings west of today’s Denver near Central City. The slogan was painted on the sides of covered wagons. Yee-Haw!

https://www.thoughtco.com/pikes-peak-31st-highest-mountain-in-colorado-755729

 

 

Route 66 into Arizona – Picturesque

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View of the Painted Desert in Arizona near Route 66.  (Photos by RonLin Photography for Tittle Thoughts.)

America’s Highway, Route 66, continues as a picturesque and interesting ride as we traveled from New Mexico into Arizona.

19421935789_1116011cd0_oWe rode along Route 66 heading for the Grand Canyon and began noticing the beautiful, painted landscape.  Isn’t it amazing how many interesting places we can find even without looking – just taking the time and making the effort. This time it is the Painted Desert. And…I didn’t even realize it at first.

19609670745_25f3a9f775_oAccording to https://www.visitarizona.com/uniquely-az/parks-and-monuments/the-painted-desert-1 , “for an unforgettable encounter with Arizona nature, enter into the Painted Desert, where art comes to life. A broad region of rocky badlands encompassing more than 93,500 acres, this vast landscape features rocks in every hue – from deep lavenders and rich grays to reds, oranges, and pinks. It’s like you’ve been transported into a painting. Located in Northern Arizona, the Painted Desert stretches from the Grand Canyon National Park eastward to the Petrified Forest National Park, with a large portion lying within the Navajo Nation.”

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HISTORY & NATURE

A natural canvas millions of years in the making, no one event shaped the Painted Desert. Instead, the area is evidence of Earth’s volatility. Home to some of the nation’s most memorable formations and features, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, floods, and sunlight, all combined to create the Painted Desert. Deposits of clay and sandstone, stacked in elegant layers, reflects the setting Arizona sun in an altering display of colorful radiance. A remarkable sight that helps make Northern Arizona so unique and picturesque.

The Navajo and Hopi people have lived in this region for hundreds of years, but it was Spanish Colonialists who gave it the name we know it by today – El Desierto Pintado.

Explore a small section of the Painted Desert that is located in the Petrified Forest National Park, just off Interstate 40 around 25 miles east of Holbrook – to get in touch with the natural landscape.

See the beautiful color striations of rock formations and mesas. For the quintessential Painted Desert experience, don’t miss the sunset – it’s when the rocks morph into an awe-inspiring canvas of fiery color.

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While at the Painted Desert I noticed a little wind increasing and then a small whirlwind (or dirt devil or dust tornado) started.  I was intrigued and it was fun to watch. (Photo by RonLin Photography for Tittle Thoughts)
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“Located at Kachina Point, 2 miles (3.2 km) from the north entrance at exit #311 off of I-40. The inn once served as a respite for travelers along historic Route 66.”  – National Park Service; (Photos by RonLin Photography for Tittle Thoughts)
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Traveling along Route 66 provides opportunities for all types of interesting sites, including seeing travelers with various, unique arrangements.

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Years ago travelers along Route 66 would just abandon their vehicles when they broke down.  I can imagine the challenges of finding service centers or repair shops along the way.

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At least when you travel Route 66 today you’ll find ample businesses, service centers and restaurants to ease any fears of travel through the “desert.”

 

With love, Ron