Streams to dams

Jackson Lake Dam, Grand Teton, Wyoming

Just think how a little stream with clear water and pebbles meanders into larger streams, rivers, lakes – providing such a powerful force that benefits, and sometimes threatens, life and land.

The Grand Teton National Park provides many opportunities for observing simple landscape to recreation, including survival. The Snake River flows into Jackson Lake, providing delight to rafters and boaters alike. Jackson Dam controls the water to benefit habitat downrange, and beyond.

May we let the streams flourish for ourselves and others, maintaining control to prevent overflow of the banks and damage to all. May we use controls within and without to benefit ourselves and others as well.

Blessings along the Way!

Ron

Settlers make a difference

Cunningham cabin at Grand Teton National Park

Frontier settlers throughout history made a difference toward building development and life itself.  Wyoming’s Grand Teton benefited by certain visionaries. 

J. Pierce Cunningham was a rancher who became a conservationist.  He settled in Jackson Hole in the 1880s despite the winter hardship.  He originally opposed the expansion of Grand Teton National Park but later became an advocate. 

Cunningham teamed with his neighbor, Josiah “Si” Ferrin to write a petition signed by 97 valley ranchers who agreed to sell their land to form a “national recreation area.”  John D. Rockefeller, Jr’s Snake River Land Company bought Cunningham’s land and other ranches.  Rockefeller later donated more than 33,000 acres to expand the national park. 

Now we can observe and preserve the beauty of the Grand Teton National Park. 

Blessings along the Way!

Ron

Grand Teton

Grand Teton range
Grand Teton National Park awaits those to behold its beauty.

Rising above a scene rich with extraordinary wildlife, pristine lakes, and alpine terrain, the Teton Range stands as a monument to the people who fought to protect it. These are mountains of imagination that led to the creation of Grand Teton National Park where you can explore more than two hundred miles of trails, float the Snake River or enjoy the serenity of this remarkable place.  https://www.nps.gov/grte/index.htm

Grand Teton Range in Wyoming

Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming is a WOW location to enjoy splendor and beauty. We enjoyed traveling through the area to observe various angles of the Teton peaks.

Grand Teton and Owen Mountain

The tallest peak is the Grand Teton (left).   Mount Owen is to the right of the Grand Teton.  Teton Glacier is in between these two mountain peaks. 

Grand Teton, tallest peak in center, with Mount Owen to the right and Middle Teton to the left. Glaciers are in between each.

The mountain peak to the left of the Grand Teton is Middle Teton.  French explorers provided the name teton.

Grand Teton National Park, which spans around 310,00 acres, is in northwestern Wyoming and surrounds the town of Jackson. It connects with Yellowstone National Park to the north.

Travel tips may be viewed at https://traveltips.usatoday.com/far-grand-teton-national-park-yellowstone-106913.html.

Which view of the Grand Teton range is your favorite?

Blessings along the Way!

Ron

Life ripples

Water view at one of Grand Teton’s glacier lakes – Jenny Lake

Who can see real beauty beneath?

We behold clear view obscured by uneven ripples.

How can we see beneath the surface,

Not knowing what lies underneath?

Yet we see beauty while trying to understand,

Not knowing full the image – is it danger or is it safe?

Only when we wait for calm to form

Will we know true intent of what’s inside.

Then we focus on what is there that we did not know;

There is calm, some rocks, but still there is growth

We look up to the splendor that wasn’t there,

When we saw what was below.

We couldn’t see while looking below,

Even the ripples made us sad.

But when we lift our eyes above,

Leaving behind that we could not see

To embrace the beauty, that was there all along.

But we chose to look below, blurs made us sigh

Til we choose – looking above,

Seeing heights and grandeur unfold. 

More than meets the eye,

When we work to understand, even though we were told.

Grand Teton National Park mountains and glacier lake

Don’t be distracted by the surface with stress and ripples,

Choose beauty and joy beyond where we are, and what will be.

Blessings along the Way!

Ron

Where buffalo roam

Wild buffalo roam freely at Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

Oh give me a home … you remember this song? You can sure identify with it when traveling to Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming, U.S.A.

Buffalo cross the road at Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

Let’s take a little look-see and observe these wonderful creatures of the wild. You’ll notice we have a “buffalo jam” or “wildlife jam.” Take a visit when you get a chance.

Driver over Bridge-Teton toward Grand Teton
Grand Teton buffalo crossing

Blessings along the Way!

Ron

Watch out for Mama Bear

Grizzly and her cub along U.S. 26/287 in Shoshone National Forest

Seeing a Grizzly beside U.S. 26/287 was a big surprise as we traveled from Dubois, Wyoming toward Grand Teton National Park.  We enjoyed the ride through the Shoshone National Forest, Togwotee Mountain, Bridger-Teton National Forest, past Lava Mountain,  another crossing of the continental divide, and finally entering the Grand Teton National Park. 

Electronic and posted signs warn humans when bear, moose or elk are near the highway. Actually, expect to see them at any time. You never know.

We hoped to see Grizzly bears, from a safe environment, and just happened to drive slowly by the mother and her cub.   Occupants in the vehicles that began stopping stayed inside their protective cages.  That’s a good thing.  These are the wildlife you wouldn’t walk up to and pet – even if we desire it. Everyone is cautioned to not become friendly with all wildlife. That’s why they are called “wild.”

I never suspected that this encounter with the Grizzly would be the only sight of one during our time in Wyoming. 

Dash cam view of Shoshone National Forest

The drive toward Grand Teton was exquisite and fun.  I really appreciate the Shoshone National Forest that showcased its beauty as much as its ruggedness.  The forest offers superb scenery and endless recreational opportunities! It was set aside in 1891 as part of the Yellowstone Timberland Reserve, making the Shoshone the first national forest in the United States.

The forest has 2.4 million acres of varied terrain ranging from sagebrush flats to rugged mountains. The higher mountains are snow-clad most of the year.

Immense areas of exposed rock are interspersed with meadows and forests. With Yellowstone National Park on its western border, the Shoshone encompasses the area from the Montana state line south to Lander, Wyoming, and includes portions of the Absaroka, Wind River and Beartooth Mountains.   https://www.fs.usda.gov/shoshone/

Grand Teton National Park view from Togwotee Mountain

I could readily notice the escalating splendor as we approached the Grand Teton.  I’ll highlight this spectacular place in the next few posts. 

Blessings along the Way!

Ron