Tombstone

Tombstone Stage Coach 3When you hear the word Tombstone, what comes to mind?

To me, the first thought was where one is buried and an inscription over the site is written in stone.

Next, I think of Tombstone, Arizona.  Have you been there?

Also, my mind goes to the movie “Tombstone.”  According to Wikipedia: “Tombstone is a 1993 American Western film directed by George P. Cosmatos, written by Kevin Jarre (who was also the original director, but was replaced early in production[4][5]), and starring Kurt Russell and Val Kilmer, with Sam ElliottBill PaxtonPowers BootheMichael Biehn, and Dana Delany in supporting roles, as well as narration by Robert Mitchum.

The film is based on events in Tombstone, Arizona, including the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral and the Earp Vendetta Ride, during the 1880s. It depicts a number of Western outlaws and lawmen, such as Wyatt EarpWilliam BrociusJohnny Ringo, and Doc Holliday.”  Here is a YouTube link to a short clip of the movie.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XTWYKf5hXIg

Well, this post is primarily about Tombstone, Arizona.

During our travels through Arizona we ventured south through Tucson. I had previously been to Tucson and enjoyed the area then so due to time constraints we decided to visit Tombstone.

According to Wikipedia, Tombstone is a historic city in Cochise County, Arizona, United States.  It was founded in 1879 by prospector Ed Schieffelin, who was briefly a scout for the U. S. Army headquartered at Camp Huachuca. He frequently searched wilderness areas looking for valuable ore samples.  Before the Tombstone name was developed the area was called Pima County, Arizona Territory.

In 1877, Schieffelin used Brunckow’s Cabin as a base of operations and began surveying the area.  After many months he found pieces of silver ore.  It took months to find the source.  According to reports, Schieffelin’s legal mining claim was sited near a grave site.  In September 1877 he filed his first claim and named the stake Tombstone.  (See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tombstone,_Arizona for details.)Tombstone StreetThe town was established on a mesa (flat-topped hill) above the Goodenough Mine. Within two years of its founding Tombstone had a bowling alley, four churches, an ice house, a school, two banks, three newspapers, and an ice cream parlor, alongside 110 saloons, 14 gambling halls, and numerous dance halls and brothels. I’m sure the ice cream parlor was the favorite.

Tombstone Longhorn Restaurant
Longhorn Restaurant that provides a good menu of food at a fair price.  It provides a realistic western town feel.

 

Tombstone became one of the last boomtowns in the American frontier.

Tombstone bird cage entertainment signThe businesses were situated among, and on top of a large number of silver mines. The gentlemen and ladies of Tombstone attended operas presented by visiting acting troupes at the Schieffelin Hall opera house.  Miners and cowboys saw shows at the Bird Cage Theatre and brothel.

The town grew significantly into the mid-1880s as the local mines produced millions in silver bullion, the largest productive silver district in Arizona. Population grew from 100 to around 14,000 in less than seven years.

At the Santa Rita mines in nearby Santa Cruz Valley, three superintendents had been killed by Indians. When friend and fellow Army Scout Al Sieber learned what Schieffelin was up to, he is quoted as telling him, “The only rock you will find out there will be your own tombstone”,[7] or, according to another version of the story, “Better take your coffin with you, Ed; you will only find your tombstone there, and nothing else.” [8][9] [references through Wikepedia)

Tombstone CourthouseTombstone’s Courthouse today provides a good collection of authentic interpretive exhibits, including: the period Sheriff’s Office, artist drawings and interpretations of the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral, Wyatt Earp, mining exhibit area, saloon and gaming room, period lawyers office and courtroom, ranching, and residents of Tombstone. (More information at https://tombstonecourthouse.com/history-of-the-courthouse/)

Tombstone Courthouse Gallows
Outside the courthouse in the courtyard is a reproduction gallows, the site where many convicted murderers met their fate.

 

Tombstone Courthouse Jail Door
Original jail doors being held up with modern framework.  One has to think of the types of criminals who passed through these doors.
Tomstone Courthouse Chair and Desk
Much of the original furniture is still in the courthouse – parts of the sheriff’s office as well as the lawyer’s office.  There is an old courtroom there as well.

Life was similar to what one would think as reflected in the western movies.  I imagine Tombstone was pretty rough with the mix of the rowdy, criminal, mischievous and law-abiding guests and residents.  Additionally, the town was far removed from larger towns where the “rule of law” prevailed.

Tombstone Stage Coach
Guests can ride on the era stagecoaches and receive excellent information about the town.

Tombstone - Bronco Trading sign

Tombstone street art
Street art reflects life in the 1800s.

Tombstone street art 2

Tombstone - OK Corral
Photo of gunfight near the O.K. Corral.

Eventually, with the wildness of the territory, there becomes a showdown.  The next post will highlight that historical event.  

Love and blessings,

Ron

  1. Beebe, Lucius Morris; Clegg, Charles. The American West: the Pictorial Epic of a Continent.
  2. “Across Arizona”. Harper’s New Monthly Magazine. 66 (364). March 1883.
  3. Bishop, William Henry (1888). Mexico, California and Arizona. New York and London: Harper and Brothers. p. 468. Retrieved May 29, 2012.

 

 

 

 

 

Dance with Joy!

Kylie, Kinley, Shelby (3)
My granddaughters are a blessing and provide so much joy!
Ballet main characters dance
Main characters of the ballet theme.

I think most end-of-year spring dance recitals in the U.S. are finishing up so I wanted to take the liberty to highlight a couple that I’ve had the privilege of attending – particularly since family was involved.

Kylie dance 15 black and white

A couple of definitions of dance on Google are “move  rythmically to music, typically following a set sequence of steps” and “move in a quick and live way”.  One other is “perform (a particular dance or a role in a ballet).”

Kylie dance 13
Oldest granddaughter

To me, ballet is a beautiful form of dance that provides inspiration with a feeling of appreciation and peace to the beholder, and is an outward expression of inward joy.

I didn’t realize this significance until our daughter began dance many moons ago at the age of five through her teens. Below are her photos taken years ago and the rest of the photos highlight wonderful, loving granddaughters.

Melissa dance 6Melissa dance 7

Melissa dance 4Melissa dance 3

Melissa danceMelissa dance 5

Melissa dance 2

I wish we had a good camera years ago to capture our daughter’s various dances.

Regardless, we have the memories and joy in our hearts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kinley dance 5
Youngest granddaughter

Now we have the joy of being involved with our grandchildren.  I just sit back and absorb their progress, expression and beauty.

Shelby dance 3
Middle granddaughter (Son’s daughter)

This too brings me joy.

Do you have similar experiences where you can see the grace and beauty being displayed?

How are dance presentations conducted in other countries.  Maybe they are called something other than recitals.

kylie with studentsKinley dance 1Shelby dance 7Shelby dance 1

 

 

Kylie dance 13

Kylie dance 9Kylie dance 14Kinley dance 5

 

 

Kinley dance 3

Kylie Dance 2

Kylie Dance 3

 

Shelby dance 6Shelby dance 5Shelby dance 4Kylie dance 6Kinley dance 7Kylie and Kinley Tap 1Shelby dance 2

Kinley dance 2

Kylie and Kinley Tap 2

Kylie dance 16
Relax and prepare during rehearsal – results in an exhaustive day for these dedicated dancers.

Kylie dance 10

Kylie dance 4

May we carry the joy within us and let it flow outward!

Love and Joy,

Ron