Stand the test of time

Rocks that tell the tale of time.

As I look at these images over and over again,

I can’t help but wonder what has passed by through the ages.

Rocks of old, pinnacles and spires – formations;

Taking untold years of change and erosion,

From the affects of the sun, rain and water – life.

But they stand, albeit weathering that which would take it down;

Representing a part of our own lives, and how we can endure.

When the affects of life take their toll and we wonder how we’ll go,

But we’ll endure with God’s help as He preserves our being,

When we have our trust in Him – 

This I know.  

National Park Service image display, edited for clarity

According to geologists and the U.S. National Park Service:

Morrison Formation, Jurassic (bottom left of photo) – Picture herds of dinosaurs grazing alongside streams; turtles and crocodiles slip unnoticed in an out of the water; termites scurry in and out of underground nests.

Dakota Sandstone, Cretaceous (next level up) – This cliff band was formed from warm river valley habitats; fossils of lush flowering plants are trees are found here.

Mancos Shale, Cretaceous – Fantastic creatures lurked in the ancient waters of a broad inland sea that deposited this shale layer; ocean waters covered Colorado.

West Elk Breccia, Tertiary – A mud flow from the West Elk Volcano that froze in time.

Blue Mesa Tuff, Tertiary (top right of photo) – Cemented ash from towering volcanoes once found near the present day San Juan Mountains. 

Pancake mountains?
National Park Service image display, edited for clarity

The Dillon Pinnacles are an example of the many spires found in the Curecanti National Forest, Colorado.  You can tell how the wind, rain and ice carved away at the landscape.  This process happens everywhere but how does the rock at this area form pinnacles? 

When the erosive forces hit the hillside, the underlying weaker rock wears away rapidly.  The more resistant tuff forms a cap of rock on top.  The cap rock helps protect some of the rock underneath while the surrounding rock erodes more quickly.  Thus, a spire or pinnacle forms.  Eventually the cap (tuff) erodes like many of the pinnacles in this area.  (U.S. National Park Service)

Hiking information in this area can be found at https://www.nps.gov/cure/planyourvisit/hiking.htm.

Blessings and love along the way!

Ron

Blue Table

As we continued our journey around the Blue Mesa Lake Reservoir in Colorado, I wondered about the name “mesa.”  Naturally, I looked it up. 

Wikipedia says:  Mesa (Spanish and Portuguese for table) is the American English term for tableland, an elevated area of land with a flat top and sides that are usually steep cliffs. It takes its name from its characteristic table-top shape. It may also be called a table hill, table-topped hill or table mountain.

So, with the blue table around and the collection of water that flows into the area, I can see how the Blue Mesa name originated.  

Blue Mesa Dam and Reservoir

The Colorado River Storage Project on the Upper Colorado River in the U.S.A. is the most complex and extensive river water development in the world.  It includes water drainage in Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona and New Mexico.  

The Curecanti National Recreation Area became one of the components of the project when it was established in 1965 with the completion of Blue Mesa Dam, creating the largest body of water in Colorado, Blue Mesa Reservoir.

“Most visitors to the park are surprised and impressed by Blue Mesa Reservoir, but do not realize there are actually three large dams and reservoirs in the park.”  National Park Service  https://www.nps.gov/cure/learn/historyculture/aspinall_unit.htm

Blessings along the way!

Ron

Blue Mesa calls me

Blue Mesa Lake provides added beauty to the Gunnison area in Colorado.

“Colorado is a landlocked state, but plenty of Rocky Mountain lakes and reservoirs offer miles of shoreline to swim in and sun yourself by each summer. Blue Mesa Reservoir — part of Curecanti National Recreation Area — is the state’s largest body of water, which means abundant recreation and lounge-worthy beaches.”
https://www.colorado.com/articles/blue-mesa-reservoir-colorado-beach

We didn’t know what to expect while traveling along highway U.S. 50 toward the Blue Mesa Lake but soon saw firsthand how beautiful the area was. Then we approached the Blue Mesa Reservoir.  

It was apparent the lake depth was down a little – probably awaiting the winter’s snow and water deluge – but the level allowed a different view that includes some of the sandy and rocky surfaces.  

Here is a little video clip of the approach to the lake area.  I’ll post more this week about the Blue Mesa Dam and river outflow.  

Blessings along the way!

Ron