Gunfight

Tombstone, Arizona became the booming city in the west and was only 30 miles (48 km) from the U.S.–Mexico border.

It was an open market for cattle stolen from ranches in Sonora, Mexico by a loosely organized band of outlaws known as The Cowboys, who began increasing their influence on the town and causing problems.

As one would anticipate, with the wild west growing, combined with treasure hunting and town entertainment, tensions would rise.

Many of the ranchers (like the Clantons) were also rustlers or other types of criminals.  Compounding efforts to keep local groups under control were political differences as well. There seemed to be no effective law enforcement to curtail the growing problems.

The Earp brothers—Wyatt, Virgil and Morgan—as well as Doc Holliday, arrived in December 1879 and mid-1880. Basically, the Earps wanted to get away from the wild life and become involved in business in Tombstone.  However, they met much resistance with Cowboys Ike and Billy Clanton, Frank and Tom McLaury, and Billy Claiborne.

The Cowboys repeatedly threatened the Earps over many months until the conflict escalated into a shootout on October 26, 1881.

The historic gunfight is often portrayed as occurring at the O.K. Corral; however, it actually occurred a short distance away in an empty lot on Fremont Street.

I’m glad our society has become more civilized since these old wild-west-days, aren’t you?

Hopefully we are not seeing a resurgence of these historical days.

So, Tombstone is best known as the site of the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral and presently draws most of its revenue from tourism.

Below is the Part 1 video I prepared from our visit to the live reenactment of the famous gunfight at O.K. Corral. This was a performance before a live audience and provides some good insight about some of the historical event.

The entire reenactment video is 16 minutes long so I divided it into three parts.  Parts 2 and 3 will be posted this week.

Blessings,

Ron

Grand Canyon – beyond words

Grand Canyon 11I really appreciate each of you traveling with me along Route 66 toward the Grand Canyon in Arizona, U.S.A.  Our journey continues as I highlight just a few things.  There is so much to post but I’ll let this website provide the details.  https://grandcanyon.com/

Grand Canyon 14There is no doubt some people disagree with the origin and timeline of the Grand Canyon.  However, I’m not here to argue the point.  Let’s just enjoy the beauty and learn a little about it based on what the National Park Service states, and our own eyes.

Grand Canyon 12You can review the archeological information and photos by the Grand Canyon Association at https://www.nps.gov/grca/learn/historyculture/adhigrca.htm.

Grand Canyon 8The Colorado River looks like a stream from observation points.  It appears so peaceful from above but it can be a raging, wild thing at times.

There are some amazing photos showcasing the river.  One photo, along with information, is on Wikipedia at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colorado_River.

“The Colorado River is one of the principal rivers of the Southwestern United States and northern Mexico (the other being the Rio Grande). The 1,450-mile-long (2,330 km) river drains an expansive, arid watershed that encompasses parts of seven U.S. and two Mexican states. Starting in the central Rocky Mountains of Colorado, the river flows generally southwest across the Colorado Plateau and through the Grand Canyon before reaching Lake Mead on the ArizonaNevada border, where it turns south toward the international border. After entering Mexico, the Colorado approaches the mostly dry Colorado River Delta at the tip of the Gulf of California between Baja California and Sonora.”


Grand Canyon 15While we were riding back and forth to the various observation points, we saw clouds developing in the distance – and then they opened.

Grand Canyon 16We were miles away from the developing storm and were able to capture a few of the weather moments.

Grand Canyon 18

Grand Canyon 17It’s amazing seeing the Canyon’s grandeur highlighted by the lightning.

I respect the lightning and at this time we determined it was best to depart the area.  Wouldn’t you?

Love and Blessings,

Ron

 

Arizona’s Greatest Canyon

Grand Canyon 9For those who have not seen the Grand Canyon in Arizona firsthand, you will be amazed and will stand there in awe.

Grand Canyon 10How can one take in such beauty and peacefulness?  It’s certainly worth a trip.

NPS Map
National Park Service Map

We drove from Flagstaff, Arizona to the South Rim of the Canyon.  One can catch the tour train dedicated for the canyon as well.  I think the drive itself was fairly peaceful and picturesque – sort of like driving on the plains and wondering where the Canyon begins.  You won’t notice it until arriving and then you see the beauty unfold below you.

 

Grand Canyon 6The National Park Service mentions a “unique combinations of geologic color and erosional forms decorate a canyon that is 277 river miles (446km) long, up to 18 miles (29km) wide, and a mile (1.6km) deep.  Grand Canyon overwhelms our senses through its immense size.” The park service has excellent information at https://www.nps.gov/grca/index.htm.

Grand Canyon 5

Grand Canyon 4

Grand Canyon 7
Sign posted on one of the rocks along the walkway.  

The South Rim is open all year but the North Rim is seasonal.

There are many other sites to explore while in the Grand Canyon region so if one has time it’s a great opportunity.

I appreciate your riding along.  I’ll provide more photos in my next post.

Love and Blessings,

Ron

Arizona’s open terrain

Arizona's open roadsWhile continuing to drive westward in Arizona toward the Grand Canyon it becomes obvious the open terrain that is combined with the natural beauty.

Trains tracks along I-40 in ArizonaComing from a populated area in Florida, along with the heavy foliage, I enjoyed seeing the openness where you can see for miles.

The long trains looked so lonely as they regularly covered their routes going west and east.  I’m sure the train engineers appreciate the rails where they can “cruise” and not encounter so many crossings in metropolitan and rural locations.

Trains along I-40 in Arizona - 2

I didn’t research the impact of rail to the rural towns as compared to the Interstates but I think the rail actually helped the smaller towns.

Trains along I-40 in ArizonaI published an earlier post about a town in Louisiana and the impact of Interstate 10.  The train’s running through the town were eventually negatively affected by the Interstate expansion as well as the town.

Trains along I-40 in Arizona - 3Even as the trains continue to run through rural routes I doubt you’ll find one stopping in the towns as compared to years past when passengers would travel on them.  Many towns now don’t rely on trains for their individual supplies neither.

What about Native Americans?  We still don’t recognize the impact of our progress and growth to their lives.

19805336192_fa349d872d_oProgress happens.  It’s what we do with it that makes the major difference.

I still enjoy the remaining beauty though; and I’m thankful for efforts of our society to be good stewards of the resources entrusted to us.

Love and Blessings!

Ron

What is Main Street USA?

Route 66 plague near Painted Desert

Ever heard of Route 66?

Route 66 was born in 1926 and is a highway with more than 2,400 miles long that ran from Chicago through Illinois, Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California – ending in Santa Monica.

Route 66 road sign in Oklahoma

Nicknames for the highway include “The Mother Road”, Main Street USA”, and “Will Rogers Highway”.

Well, I think it’s about time I provide a few blogs about one of our trips through parts of Route 66.  This is the first of my blogs to highlight the famous route.

Route 66 map
NPS map of Route 66.  Route 66 was launched as the nation’s first Federal highway system.  It was intertwined with local, state and national roads.

The National Park Service also has excellent information and history on this “special place in American consciousness.”  https://www.nps.gov/nr/travel/route66/maps66.html

I still recall as a young person the move series and couple of guys riding Route 66 in a Corvette and the motto “Get Your Kicks” on Route 66.  Here is a video clip of Nat King Cole’s song that may trigger some memories.

 

As I think back about the movie I recall the simpler times, local-small businesses, restaurants, cafes and gas stations that catered to the new found freedoms on the road.

That was part of our experience as we attempted to locate Route 66 during our travels into Oklahoma, New Mexico and Arizona.  I actually “stumbled” on the highway initially when I noticed the first sign, and then tried to follow the route as much as possible.  It was interesting and fun.

Route 66 Glenn's Bakery

I’ll just provide a few highlights along the route we traveled.  I was taken back in time as I noticed the historic sites and reminders of our past when people were just taking to the road with the new, influential automobile.

Route 66 motel

Smithsonianmag.com lists Route 66 as an endangered site as the highway is easing into the past and not aging gracefully.  https://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel/endangered-site-historic-route-66-usa-52145829/.

Here is another result of societal and roadway improvements – this time being set aside by the Interstate System.  I’m glad we have the Interstate but I also like the back roads too – encouraging me to slow down some and take in the sites and sounds.

Route 66 abandoned business

It’s sad in a way as history seems to just dissolve away.  Some of the old restaurants naturally can’t stay in business without help.

I propose groups and businesses take a special interest in keeping this important part of our history.

My next Route 66 blog is coming soon.

With Love,

Ron