Preparation begins when?

Storm over oceanSeptember is a month for many major hurricanes and tropical storms threaten the U.S., mostly from the Atlantic Ocean.  The U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) issued a preparation statement during the weekend advising the public that it’s National Preparedness Month.  The theme for this week is for everyone to make an emergency plan, encouraging each of us to write, share and practice it.

Hurricane damage on San Jose Blvd

I know – much of the U.S. does not live near the coast to be threatened by hurricanes or tropical storms, but what about tornados?  What about ice storms? What about events that may require us to remain indoors, or without electrical power?  Have you thought through the “what if” scenario sufficiently?

Get a plan for disasters - from Ready.gov

All communities worldwide should be prepared for the what if.

Florida has a great plan to encourage the public to think through potential threats.  https://floridadisaster.org/.

Additionally, all of us should keep informed from local emergency planners and response agencies as all disasters are local.

Florida’s emergency management division suggests the following concept for a basic plan.

Step 1: Put together a plan by discussing these 4 questions with your family, friends, or household to start your emergency plan.

How will I receive emergency alerts and warnings?                  

  1. What is my shelter plan?
  2. What is my evacuation route?
  3. What is my family/household communication plan?

Step 2:  Consider specific needs in your household.

As you prepare your plan tailor your plans and supplies to your specific daily living needs and responsibilities. Discuss your needs and responsibilities and how people in the network can assist each other with communication, care of children, business, pets, or specific needs like the operation of durable medical equipment. Create your own personal network for specific areas where you need assistance.

Step 3: Create an Emergency Plan

You can download a America’s PrepareAthon template plan.

Step 4: Practice your plan with your family/household

Be safe, regardless of the time of year!  You are special!

Blessings!

Ron

 

36 thoughts on “Preparation begins when?

  1. Excellent points, Ron. I was born and raised in Florida and experienced several hurricanes. Being prepared is most important! Currently living in North Georgia, where the weather is a bit milder but still have to be aware of what may be coming our way. Thank you for following BrewNSpew.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you very much. I’m still in Florida and we keep a watch all the time. North Georgia is beautiful. I enjoy traveling through there when I can, or making short stays. I still have some photos of waterfalls in the area that I’ll post one of these days. Glad to follow your blog. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Here in So. CA, we have earthquakes, flash floods, and fires – this year a LOT of fires. We have had CERT training (or those who help the first responders), and it was pretty good, but you can never be too ready. We have animals to get out of the house too, so we have to not only prepare for ourselves but them too. And I could not leave if our neighbors (we are in a senior mobile home park) were not ready or needed help, so I am glad we have some training. You can never have too much. Thanks for this good information. It can be the difference between life and death.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That’s great Anne. I’m so glad you all are aware of the CERT and are involved in helping your community. Wouldn’t it be great for all communities to come together like this to help one another, especially during and after a crisis. I’ve thought about you all regularly with the fires and pray for safety of responders, residents, guests and protection over homes. We sometimes have a heavy fire season but it wasn’t bad this year. Preparation is so important in every aspect of our natural surroundings.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. This is really helpful l and encouraging for everyone. We live on the coast in Australia but not in any disaster belts. However, this does not rule out disaster and you post has encouraged me to make a plan. Thanks Roninjax, this was an interesting tea party discussion, not what I expected but life changing. Thanks, Lots of love and God go with you as the hurricane hits.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you Lauren. If we can have families worldwide to think through the “what ifs” and have a plan then maybe we can help save one life. Then we can can enjoy the tea parties and fellowship without fear. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  4. In Southern California I don’t have to worry too much about hurricanes but we are constantly under threat of “The Big One” earthquake. I keep bottles of water all over the house and figure in an emergency I’ll eat cat food!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. At least you have thought it through. Yes, earthquakes are also destructive and can leave millions without food, water and items of comfort and transportation. Fires can also change a persons lifestyle quickly. Thanks.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks. I agree. Folks sure need to listen to local emergency management leaders. Something that other states in the area should be aware also is that hotels and restaurants will be booked for the most part to accommodate the evacuees. Expect potential fuel issues if you’re traveling in the area too.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much Tanya. I’m glad you’re prepared. We never know when something could happen on short notice. At least a plan provides a better piece of mind. I trust you’re keeping a watch for the hurricanes cruising the Atlantic.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks Lynn. It looks like Florence may be setting eyes toward you all or NC. I pray it will be diverted back to sea though. Regardless, we all need to be prepared throughout the year because we could lose power for lengths of time without notice. At least we can help one another via blogs too.
      🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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