From Virginia to Pennsylvania – home town America

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North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania – the miles click by.  I could have stopped in each small town and stay awhile but I was on a journey.

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Evergreen trees – AKA Christmas trees – blanket some of the terrain from the northern part of North Carolina and into Virginia.  They’ve likely adorned thousands of homes during our recent holidays.

Sometimes the destination becomes the object of our focus and we pass by areas of interest on the journey.

These photos are glimpses of the “blink of an eye” travel. Sometimes you just have to stopped and pause.  I’m glad the camera helps us freeze, and seize, the moment when we see one.

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Farms along the open countryside in Virginia and Pennsylvania capture your attention as you cruise along.

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While these picturesque sites are great to see, I wonder if the work behind the scene compensates for the beauty and peacfulness of farm life.  How about it farmers?  What do you say?

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I love west Pennsylvania’s farms, rolling hills and the peaceful back roads.  It seems a different life when you compare the western side to the eastern side.   While larger cities like Philadelphia and Pittsburgh have so much to offer, it’s hard to beat the easy-going routes between the cities.  Life just slows down.

One of my favorite places to stay, although it’s an international brand, is the Hampton Inn, part of the Hilton Hotel family.  I really enjoy staying at their facilities.  It is a relaxing hotel that gives you that special sense of cleanliness and comfort.  You can tell by the fresh smell.  Oh, did I mention the complimentary full breakfast.   Yep!

We stayed at the Hampton Inn in York, Pennsylvania. I’ve been through York previously but this time I wanted to gather a little more information about the area.

York, Pennsylvania is a city of about 40,000 people. Yorkcountypa.gov mentions that Pennsylvania’s York County was founded in 1749 and has a proud role in the history of the United States.

The formation of the new nation – USA had many challenges toward development.  One was an organized resistance during the American Revolution. The Articles of Confederations, which was the precursor to the U.S. Constitution, was drafted in York.

Yorkpa.org mentioned York, Pennsylvania as the first capital of the United States.

Laid out by the Penn family as the first city west of the Susquehanna River in 1741, less than four decades later York became the seat of power for the U.S. when it hosted a Continental Congress on the run from British troops in 1777.

William Penn, a Quaker who was born in 1644 in London, England, was an English real estate entrepreneur, philosopher and founder of the Province of Pennsylvania, the English North American colony and future Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. (Wikipedia.org).

In 1681 King Charles II handed over a large piece of his American land holdings to William Penn to satisfy a debt the king owed to Penn’s father.

York is also referenced as the “Factory Tour Capital of the World.”  According to Trip Advisor there are thirteen different factories open to the public.   You can learn about potato chips and how they’re made to how Harley-Davidson Motor Company makes their motorcycles.

The York Barbell Factory is also located here.  The USA Weightlifting Hall of Fame is included.

It’s amazing the locations one will encounter when you don’t have a specific travel agenda and take advantage of opportunities.

While traveling northeast from York we crossed the Susquehanna River.  I was intrigued by the railroad bridge that was parallel to our crossing but didn’t notice the very bridge I traveled.  Well, I decided to turn around and take a look.

penn-bridge-near-yorkI was amazed at the architecture of the bridge. Just think, you don’t notice the beauty around you until you pause a little to reflect.

This is the Columbia-Wrightsville Bridge in Columbia.  Construction began in 1929, opened in 1930 and renamed as the Veterans Memorial Bridge in 1980.

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More information about the bridge may be viewed at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Columbia%E2%80%93Wrightsville_Bridge.

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The area is serene and picturesque. The feeling underneath the bridge is peaceful and you don’t notice the traffic above.

leisure-boat-ride-near-york-bridgeThere is the calm along the river as well and locals enjoy it – whether pleasure boating, kayaking or just fishing.  You can’t go wrong with these options.

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I can see why our ancestors who traveled to the various parts of this new world decided to settle and make a new life for themselves. Wouldn’t you?

Well, I know there are untold treasures around the globe and we write about them every day.  I just wanted to share little about my discoveries along the way.

6 thoughts on “From Virginia to Pennsylvania – home town America

  1. Nice pictures and a pleasant drive. Farmlands do look so peaceful, but farmers’ lives are meant to be pretty tough. York sounds like a good place to visit on a roadtrip, and thanks for the brief reminder of the Penn family: I recall William Penn lived an incredibly varied and interesting life … worth looking up again 🙂

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    1. Thank you. I felt like I was incorporating too many angles into one post but I wanted to get it out as soon as possible. It’s amazing the influence of those who journeyed to to the country in the last and made a difference for the present.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. History is fascinating, and I particularly like US history ’cause it’s relatively close to our times. No end to good stories, whatever angle you choose!

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